JK/SK Early Years: Realizing Differences

Introduction

Learning Environment: Key Considerations

In organizing the learning environment for the topic of Accessibility Awareness, teachers and other adults in the classroom will provide children with a safe and healthy environment for learning where a wide range of opportunities to learn, practise, and demonstrate knowledge and skills in all areas of learning is available. A balance of exploration or investigation, guided instruction, and explicit instruction will offer children many opportunities to build on their existing knowledge, create and clarify their own new understandings, and experience a variety of approaches to a problem or question.

For this topic, the learning environment should include centres where children will be able to:

  • learn about individual differences, special needs and special equipment used by a variety of story characters while listening to and observing pictures in a variety of books.
  • have the opportunity to respond to oral questions and share their experiences while listening and discussing a variety of stories about children who are unique and special.
  • have the opportunity to respond to the stories in a variety of learning centres.
  • have the opportunity to explore a variety of fiction and non-fiction books and make observations and comparisons about their own characteristics that make them unique or special.

Connections to Accessibility Awareness – Big Ideas

  • Some students sometimes need special assistance, equipment or technology to learn.
  • Accessibility Awareness includes information about the range of ability and individual strengths found in the classroom.
  • Students need to help develop a school culture that fosters a sense of belonging for all students.
  • The goal of Accessibility Awareness is to shape a society in which individuals are appreciated for their intrinsic worth.

Respect for diversity, equity, and inclusion are prerequisites for honouring children’s rights, optimal development, and learning. See page 2, 2010-11 The Full-Day Early Learning – Kindergarten Program (Draft Version).

Considerations

Important Considerations for Program Planning

In keeping with the inclusive nature of accessibility and research-based teaching practices, the learning environment must provide a continuum of supports for all students, including those with accessibility considerations and/or special education needs. The 2010-11 The Full-Day Early Learning – Kindergarten Program (Draft Version) highlights elements to consider in program planning for the classroom, including Universal Design, Differentiated Instruction, equity and inclusive education, the perspective of First Nation, Métis and Inuit people, meeting the needs of English Language Learners and of students with special education needs. Please see pages 33 – 47 of 2010-11 The Full-Day Early Learning – Kindergarten Program (Draft Version) for more information.

Community Connections

Connections with parents, members of the broader school community, agencies and institutions, social services, community organizations, corporations, and local businesses provide important opportunities for supporting accessibility awareness for students. Community partners can be an important resource in students’ learning as volunteers, mentors, guest speakers, participants in the school’s accessibility events or models of accessibility awareness in the life of the community. Modelling and mentoring can enrich not only the educational experience of students but also the life of the community. Schools should ensure that partnerships are nurtured within the context of strong educational objectives.

If the topic of a lesson is about a disability and a child in the classroom has that disability, it is important to discuss that lesson with the child, if appropriate, and his or her parents so that planning can be respectful and strengths-based in perspective.

Curriculum

Curriculum Document(s)/Grade

2010-11 The Full-Day Early Learning – Kindergarten Program (Draft Version).

Curriculum Expectations (as stated in the Ontario curriculum documents)

Social Development

Children can engage in activities that increase their awareness of others and foster respect for individual differences.

Big Idea: Children are connected to others and contribute to their world.

Overall Expectations:

  1. demonstrate a beginning understanding of the diversity in individuals, families, schools, and the wider community.

Emotional Development

Through a variety of experiences, children begin to see themselves as unique.

Big Idea: Children have a strong sense of identity and well-being.

Overall Expectations:

  1. demonstrate a sense of identity and a positive self-image

Language

Big Idea: Children are Effective Communicators

Overall Expectations:

  1. communicate by talking and by listening and speaking to others for a variety of purposes and in a variety of contexts
  2. demonstrate understanding and critical awareness of a variety of written materials that are read by and with the EL–K team

Visual Arts

Overall Expectations:

  1. demonstrate an awareness of themselves as artists through engaging in activities in visual arts
  2. demonstrate basic knowledge and skills gained through exposure to visual arts and activities in visual arts
  3. use problem-solving strategies when experimenting with the skills, materials, processes, and techniques used in visual arts both individually and with others
  4. communicate their ideas through various visual art forms

Math Strand: Geometry

Big Idea: Young children have a conceptual understanding of mathematics and of mathematical thinking and reasoning.

Overall Expectations:

  1. describe, sort, classify, build, and compare two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional figures, and describe the location and movement of objects through investigation

Instruction & Context

Development of Goals

As a child’s self-concept develops, they demonstrate autonomy in selecting materials, making choices, and setting goals for themselves. Please see the 2010-11 The Full-Day Early Learning – Kindergarten Program (Draft Version) (page 59) for more information.

Assessment of Overall Expectations

All program expectations must be accounted for in instruction, but evaluation will focus on the child’s achievement of the overall expectations. Achievement of the overall expectations is evaluated on the basis of the child’s achievement of related specific expectations. The overall expectations are broad in nature, and the specific expectations define the particular content or scope of the knowledge skills referred to in the overall expectations. The specific expectations will assist Early Learning–Kindergarten teams in describing the range of behaviours, skills, and strategies that children demonstrate as they work towards achieving the overall expectations. Team members will use their professional judgement to determine which specific expectations should be used to evaluate achievement of the overall expectations and which ones will be the focus for instruction and assessment (e.g., through direct observation) but not necessarily evaluated. Please see the 2010-11 The Full-Day Early Learning – Kindergarten Program (Draft Version) (page 28 – 31) for more information.

Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

The Early Learning-Kindergarten team uses reflective practice, planned observation, and a range of assessment strategies to identify the strengths, needs, and interests of individual children in order to provide instruction that is appropriate for each child (“differentiated instruction”). Please see the 2010-11 The Full-Day Early Learning – Kindergarten Program (Draft Version) (page 8) for more information.

Readiness

To participate fully in these learning activities:

  • Children need to know how to sit to listen to a story.
  • Children need to know the expectations for answering questions in turn in a whole group lesson.
  • Children need to know the expectations for how to choose a learning centre and the expected behaviour while at the learning centre.

Terminology

Cane, differences, feeding tube, guardian, parent, special equipment, special needs, other terminology that might come up in discussion or from other instructional materials.

This terminology should be discussed and understood to help students be able to participate in the activities as a group or at centres.

Materials and Equipment

Picture of a book cover for a prediction activity (see Appendix A).
Book Different is Just…Different! by Karen Tompkins or interactive white board to show book.

(When you open the link the page will be blank. Use the arrows at the bottom of the link to move to the beginning of the book.)

Pictures of Shoo Bear

Arts and craft materials

Puppets, stuffed bears, dolls (variety of characters) to put at the drama or puppet centre
Three-dimensional solids and shapes for the construction centre

See Appendix B for a list of suggested books for the reading centre

Please see the 2010-11 The Full-Day Early Learning – Kindergarten Program (Draft Version) for more information.

Assessment

Observation is the most important aspect of assessment in early learning and should be an integral part of all assessment strategies. Please see the 2010-11 The Full-Day Early Learning – Kindergarten Program (Draft Version) (page 28 – 31) for more information.

Observations:

  • Are children engaged in the topic and the learning activities?
  • Do children have an understanding of what “different” means?
  • Do children have an understanding of what it means to make a prediction?
  • Do children have an understanding of the questions being asked?
  • Are children able to answer the teacher questions to guide the discussion of the cover illustration?
  • Are they able to answer the questions being asked about the story?
  • Are children able to verbalize what differences there are among the bears on the cover of the book?
  • Do children demonstrate interest in centre activities?
  • Are children able to respond to early learning staff comments or questions about the centres?
  • Are children able to answer what characteristics they have that are different from those of other children?

Lesson

Activity: Whole Class Read-Aloud and Learning Centre Follow-Up Activities

This lesson will focus on the following Accessibility Awareness messages:

  • Some students sometimes need special assistance, equipment or technology to learn.
  • Accessibility Awareness includes information about the range of ability and individual strengths found in the classroom.
  • Students need to help develop a school culture that fosters a sense of belonging for all students.
  • The goal of Accessibility Awareness is to shape a society in which individuals are appreciated for their intrinsic worth.

Minds On

Show children the cover of the book Different is Just…Different! by Karen Tompkins. Available directly from the author at Karen Tompkins (differentisjustdifferent@gmail.com). This book is also available for use on an interactive white board. (When you open the link the page will be blank. Use the arrows at the bottom of the link to move to the beginning of the book, and then start to flip the pages.)

Different is Just...Different! book cover

Using the picture of the cover from Appendix A, read them the title and ask them to predict what the story might be about. Encourage many responses from a variety of children. Other questions to ask about the cover to generate discussion may include:

What do you notice about the bears? How are the bears different? Focus the children’s attention on the specific parts of the bears. What do you notice about the bears’ feet? What do you notice about the bears’ hands? What do you notice about the bears’ eyes? What do you notice about the bears’ ears?

Any of the suggested books for the reading centre listed in The Reading Centre Activity or other similar literature can be used for this introduction with questions adapted to suit that book.

Action

Using appropriate read-aloud strategies for this age group, read the book to students.
For more information on the read-aloud strategy, please see: Early Reading Strategy: The Report of the Expert Panel on Early Reading in Ontario, 2003 (page 24).

Begin reading the story. Read the first two pages and ask the children to look at the illustrations. What do you notice about Shoo Bear? Ask them if they have ever seen a hat like that. What is your favourite kind of hat? Why? (Make a connection.) Do you like things that are different?

Read the next page. What is in the sandwich? Do you think a bear would like this kind of food? Have you ever eaten a sandwich like that? What kind of sandwich do you like? (Make a personal connection.)

Continue reading the next 2 pages. Can anyone tell me what kind of shoes these are? When do you wear these types of shoes? Which shoes do you wish you were wearing right now? Have you ever worn these kinds of shoes before?

Continue reading the next 4 pages. What kinds of shoes do we see on these pages? Do you have different kinds of shoes at home? Tell us about your favourite shoes.

Continue reading the next 2 pages. Do you know anyone who has different needs like the bears in the pictures?

Continue reading the next 2 pages. Does anyone here or anyone at your house wear glasses? What do you think the cane is for?

Continue reading the next 2 pages. Explain the picture of the feeding tube. When children are babies, they need help eating, so someone will feed them or cut their food for them. The bear in this picture can’t swallow food at all so his parent/guardian is putting it right into his stomach.

Explain that some people cannot talk and use a computer or sign language to talk. Does anyone know any signs in sign language?

Continue reading the next 3 pages. Ask children how they are different? Is being different a good thing or a bad thing?

Allow for children to answer and share information with the group.

If another book is used, follow a similar process.

Learning Centre Activities – Small Group

Set up the following centres to include bears, people or characters from any of the other stories listed in Appendix B or other similar books. The purpose of the follow-up centre activities is to engage children in identifying and discussing how they and others are unique. These activities will introduce awareness of accessibility issues.

Retelling Centre: After reading the story Different is Just…Different!, place the book in the Retelling Centre. Leave pictures of Shoo Bear available on the website www.ktompkins.com/different at the retelling centre so children can retell the story in their own words. Have a variety of animals and people available at the retelling centre so any story the children hear or know can be retold.

Dramatic Play Centre: After reading the story Different is Just…Different! encourage children to use bears, stuffed animals, puppets and props to act out the story in the Dramatic Play Centre. Have a variety of puppets and props available so that the children can act out any favourite story or come up with their own.

Art Centre: After reading the story Different is Just…Different!, leave pictures of Shoo Bear available on the website www.ktompkins.com/different at the Art Centre. Outlines of children or other animals can also be made available. Children can then use paper to cut out by themselves different hats, shoes or outfits for a bear, another animal or any other character, or one of the illustrations in the book. Children can also draw or paint their own bears, other animals or pictures of themselves or other children.

Building Centre: After reading the story Different is Just…Different! encourage students to use paper towel rolls, cardboard and 3-D shapes in the Building Centre to make a walker or a wheelchair or a cane to use as props in the puppet centre. Place books at the Building Centre containing pictures of equipment used by people with disabilities.

Reading Centre: Gather a variety of books that deal with being special or unique and include them in the reading centre. Try to find fiction and non-fiction books that depict a variety of people using assistive equipment. There are many books that deal with this topic, including those in the following list:

  • A Rainbow of Friends
    by P.K. Hallinan
  • Arnie and the New Kid
    by Nancy Carlson
  • Chrysanthemum
    by Kevin Henkes
  • I Like Myself!
    by Karen Beaumont
  • I’m gonna like me
    by Jamie Lee Curtis and Laura Cornell
  • It’s Okay to be Different
    by Todd Parr
  • Lemon the Duck
    by Laura Backman
  • Let’s Talk about Being in a Wheelchair
    by Melanie Ann Apel
  • My Friend Isabelle
    by Eliza Woloson
  • Special People, Special Ways
    by Arlene Maguire
  • Susan Laughs
    by Jeanne Willis
  • The Black Book of Colors
    by Menena Cottin and Rosana Faria
  • The Chick and the Duckling
    by Mirra Ginsburg
  • What I Like About Me!: A Book Celebrating Differences
    by Allia Zobel-Nolan
  • Whoever You Are
    by Mem Fox
  • Zoom!
    by Robert Munsch*

* Listen to this story read aloud by Robert Munch at http://robertmunsch.com/book/zoom.
Another resource that relates directly to this topic and may be of interest to some students is Differences, a colouring book from Parents Let’s Unite for Kids (PLUK), 2005
Please see the Accessibility+ hub for more information about resources related to this lesson.

Writing Centre: Make I am special because… sentence starter strips available to children at the writing centre for them to complete. Children can draw a picture and add their own words if they choose to. Children’s work can made into a class book to be shared. This book can be added to the reading centre when completed.

Children can write and illustrate their own book about why they are special.

Reflection

Teacher Reflection

Did I organize learning opportunities in keeping with philosophy of the 2010-11 The Full-Day Early Learning – Kindergarten Program (Draft Version) in order to provide a safe playing-based environment that promotes the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development of all children?

Did I incorporate student friendly teaching strategies to support research-based practices that incorporate accessible methods and materials to reach as many students as possible?

Are the resources I selected appropriate for the interest level of my students and varied to meet their needs?

If the resources I selected presented aspects of accessibility awareness, was the perspective strength based?

Did I use Differentiated Instruction and Assessment to meet the varying learning styles of my students?

Were all my students engaged at all steps of the lesson? How do I know?

Were my assessment procedures fair and equitable? Have I demonstrated best practices and met the individual needs of my students? Have I accommodated in fair and equitable ways for students with special learning needs?

How do I ensure that the concept of accessibility is not only discussed but embedded in all conversation topics taught in the classroom?

How could this lesson be improved in the future?

How can I improve my own teaching practice to better address accessibility awareness issues?

How do I help promote accessibility awareness across my school and school board and share the results with parents and colleagues?

Introduction

Résumé

Reconnaître et accepter les différences des personnes qui l’entourent est une étape importante dans la vie de l’enfant, qui doit apprendre à accepter et à célébrer ces différences sans oublier sa propre identité.

Chaque personne est différente, et c’est en lisant et en discutant le livre Meringuette la petite cane que l’élève sera sensibilisé à la tolérance et à l’acceptation des personnes ayant des handicaps. L’idée directrice de cette leçon est de créer un climat d’inclusion dans la classe. La leçon doit se faire sur plusieurs périodes de travail. Puisque l’histoire est assez longue pour ce niveau, la lecture est divisée en trois parties. Après chacune des lectures, l’élève complétera des activités dans les différents centres d’apprentissage. Ces centres, qui sont créés de sorte que chacun des types d’intelligence y soit représenté, comprennent la création artistique, la construction, la dramatisation, le dessin, l’écriture guidée et la lecture partagée. Dans les centres d’apprentissage, l’élève a l’occasion d’explorer les idées et les concepts et de développer, individuellement et en groupe, de nouvelles connaissances et habiletés. L’élève apprend alors à réfléchir, à questionner et à résoudre des problèmes. L’élève apprend aussi à mieux gérer son temps, à exprimer ses choix et à devenir plus responsable de ses apprentissages.

Messages de sensibilisation à l’accessibilité : les grandes idées

Cette leçon est axée sur les messages suivants :

  • Les élèves ont besoin de contribuer à créer une culture scolaire qui favorise un sentiment d’appartenance chez chaque élève.
  • L’empathie envers autrui et le respect de la dignité de chaque personne sont des caractéristiques essentielles d’une classe, d’une école et d’une société inclusives.
  • Les plus grands obstacles à l’accessibilité sont les attitudes et le manque de sensibilisation.

Considérations

Considérations concernant la planification du programme

Étant donné la nature inclusive de l’accessibilité et conformément aux pratiques exemplaires en matière de pédagogie, les leçons et l’enseignement doivent prévoir un continuum de mesures de soutien destinées à l’ensemble des élèves, y compris celles et ceux qui bénéficient de mesures d’accessibilité ou qui ont des besoins particuliers. La matrice de tous les programmes-cadres révisés énumère les éléments à prendre en considération pour planifier les leçons et l’enseignement, y compris la conception universelle de l’enseignement, la différenciation pédagogique, l’équité et l’inclusion, la perspective des Premières nations, des Métis et des Inuits ainsi que les moyens de répondre aux besoins particuliers des élèves en difficulté ou bénéficiant des programmes d’actualisation linguistique en français ou d’appui aux nouveaux arrivants. Pour en savoir plus sur ces éléments et sur des sujets connexes, consultez la section Accessibilité+.

Liens avec la communauté

Les relations avec les parents, les membres de la communauté scolaire au sens large, les organismes et institutions, les services sociaux, les organismes communautaires ainsi que les sociétés et les entreprises locales offrent de belles occasions d’appuyer la sensibilisation à l’accessibilité chez les élèves. Les partenaires communautaires peuvent avoir une contribution importante à l’apprentissage des élèves lorsque des bénévoles, des mentors, des conférenciers invités ou d’autres personnes participent aux activités de l’école axées sur l’accessibilité ou sont des modèles de sensibilisation à l’accessibilité dans la communauté. Le bon exemple et le mentorat peuvent enrichir non seulement l’expérience d’apprentissage des élèves mais aussi la vie de la communauté. Les écoles devraient veiller à ce que des projets soient réalisés en partenariat dans le contexte d’objectifs d’apprentissage bien définis.

Lorsqu’une leçon doit porter sur le handicap d’une ou un élève, il importe d’en discuter avec l’élève en question et ses parents pour planifier la leçon avec respect et adopter une perspective axée sur les points forts de l’élève.

La leçon se termine en encourageant l’élève à amener à la maison le livre créé par la classe : Nous sommes spéciaux parce que nous sommes tous différents! Le livre circulera tour à tour chez chaque élève afin que les enfants puissent partager leur travail avec leurs parents.

Curriculum

Programme-cadre

Curriculum de l’Ontario : Programme d’apprentissage à temps plein de la maternelle et du jardin d’enfants, 2010-2011, Version provisoire

Attentes et contenus d’apprentissage du programme-cadre

Idée maîtresse : Les enfants sont en interaction avec les autres et apportent leur contribution à la vie de la classe.

L’élève :

  • choisit et varie ses activités de façon autonome;
  • persévère et termine la tâche dans le délai fixé;
  • reconnaît les traits physiques qui lui sont propres;
  • reconnaît et décrit ses intérêts et ses goûts;
  • raconte des expériences personnelles et reconnaît qu’elles lui sont propres;
  • collabore avec les autres en diverses circonstances;
  • démontre de la considération pour les autres et respecte les règles de la vie en groupe;
  • accepte les différences individuelles et démontre du respect pour la diversité.

Idée maîtresse : Les enfants sont des communicateurs efficaces.

L’élève :

  • écoute des présentations, des histoires et des messages et y réagit de façon appropriée;
  • démontre une attitude positive envers la lecture;
  • démontre un intérêt pour l’écriture;
  • suit les règles de la communication orale;
  • suit une conversation et y participe;
  • communique avec des intentions variées telles que :
    • demander;
    • commenter;
    • décrire;
    • raconter des expériences personnelles;
  • reconnaît les éléments de présentation d’un livre (p. ex., identifier la page couverture à l’endroit, tourner les pages correctement, repérer le titre du livre et le nom de l’auteur);
  • comprend que les illustrations contiennent de l’information qui appuie le message écrit et s’y réfère constamment pour construire le sens du texte;
  • comprend le sens de l’écriture;
  • fait des hypothèses sur un livre à partir de l’illustration de la page couverture;
  • dégage le sens d’un texte en se référant aux illustrations;
  • comprend que l’écrit est porteur de messages;
  • utilise une combinaison d’illustrations, de symboles, de gribouillis, de lettres ou une orthographe approchée pour communiquer un message;
  • fournit des idées dans les activités d’écriture modelée et partagée.

Idée maîtresse : Les enfants ont une compréhension des concepts, de la pensée et du raisonnement mathématiques.

L’élève :

  • utilise les termes gros ou petit, long ou court, plein ou vide, lourd ou léger pour exprimer des mesures et partager ses observations;
  • utilise les termes pour décrire des figures géométriques et partager ses observations;
  • trace, dessine et assemble des figures planes pour obtenir des images, des dessins ou des formes.

Idée maîtresse : Les enfants s’intéressent naturellement aux activités artistiques.

L’élève :

  • explore et utilise diverses techniques et divers procédés dans ses créations en arts visuels;
  • explore et utilise diverses techniques et divers procédés dans ses créations dramatiques;
  • accomplit des tâches de motricité fine qui font appel à la dextérité;
  • découpe, dessine, peint et imprime en montrant une bonne utilisation de ses ciseaux, de sa craie, de son pinceau et de son crayon;
  • présente ses productions artistiques dans ses propres mots.

Idée maitresse : Développement personnel et social

L’élève :

  • collabore avec les autres en diverses circonstances (p. ex., partage ses jeux, son matériel, ses idées, participe à la réalisation de projets collectifs);
  • accepte les différences individuelles et démontre du respect pour la diversité (p. ex., des enfants handicapés, de groupes ethniques différents).

CONTEXTE DE L’ENSEIGNEMENT

Objectifs d’apprentissage

L’enseignante ou l’enseignant et les élèves déterminent ensemble des objectifs d’apprentissage liés aux attentes du curriculum et exprimés dans un langage adapté aux élèves. Les objectifs définis en commun sont affichés dans la classe à des fins de référence. Pour en savoir plus à ce sujet, consultez la section Accessibilité+.

Critères de réussite

L’enseignante ou l’enseignant et les élèves déterminent ensemble les critères de réussite de chaque leçon en se fondant sur les attentes du curriculum et sur la capacité des élèves de montrer qu’ils connaissent le contenu de la leçon, qu’ils exercent leur pensée critique, qu’ils établissent des liens et, selon la nature de l’activité, qu’ils ont une expérience ou des connaissances personnelles à ce sujet. Les critères de réussite définis en commun sont affichés dans la classe à des fins de référence. Pour en savoir plus à ce sujet, consultez la section Accessibilité+.

Différenciation pédagogique et évaluation différenciée

Pour en savoir plus sur la différenciation pédagogique et l’évaluation différenciée, consultez L’apprentissage pour tous – Guide d’évaluation et d’enseignement efficaces pour tous les élèves de la maternelle à la 12e année.

Préparation

L’élève doit :

  • avoir déjà mis en pratique en classe différentes stratégies de lecture (faire des prédictions, faire des liens, inférer);
  • être capable d’utiliser, de façon autonome, des ciseaux et de la colle;
  • connaître le nom de figures simples – carré, cercle, triangle, rectangle, étoile et cœur – et pouvoir reconnaître ces formes;
  • avoir déjà mis en pratique en classe les règles de la communication en suivant des conversations et en y participant.

Terminologie

L’enseignante ou l’enseignant examine la terminologie employée dans chaque leçon avec les élèves et s’assure que chaque élève la comprend bien afin de pouvoir remplir les objectifs d’apprentissage. Les termes employés dans la leçon et les discussions sont affichés dans la classe à des fins de référence :

  • les prédictions
  • les éléments d’un livre : la couverture, le titre, les images, les personnages
  • un handicap
  • pareils, différents
  • grand, petit, long, court
  • la ressemblance, la différence
  • le braille
  • les défis
  • les besoins
  • une personne aveugle
  • les intérêts
  • la taille
  • la capacité
  • les émotions
  • ressentir / se sentir

Matériel et équipement

Pour donner la leçon comme il est indiqué ci-après, vous aurez besoin des éléments suivants :

  • Meringuette la petite cane, Laura Backman, Les Éditions Homard ISBN : 978-2-922435-20-7
Meringuette la petite cane

« Madame Larivière et ses élèves ont attendu depuis un mois de voir éclore une couvée de quatre canetons, qu’ils accueillent maintenant avec joie. Mais les élèves remarquent vite que la douce Meringuette est différente des autres nouveau-nés. Bien qu’elle ait l’apparence d’un canard et qu’elle pépie à qui mieux mieux, elle n’arrive pas à se tenir debout ni à marcher. Comment Meringuette pourra-t-elle être heureuse, si elle ne peut faire tout ce que les canards aiment faire? Découvrez comment les élèves ont aidé Meringuette à se relever grâce à leur ingéniosité et leur attention très spéciale, et comment cette petite cane inoubliable leur a fait découvrir une belle leçon d’amour et d’acceptation. Histoire basée sur des faits réels. »

  • Le livre noir des couleurs, Menen Cottin, Rue du Monde (2007), ISBN : 978-2355040023
Meringuette la petite cane
« Sur chaque page de gauche, Thomas (un personnage aveugle) parle de comment il perçoit les couleurs et des sensations qu’elles évoquent en lui. Les illustrations sérigraphiées sur la page de droite apparaissent en relief noir sur un papier soyeux au toucher. Le texte est imprimé en alphabet classique et repris en braille. Donne en fin d’ouvrage l’alphabet inventé par Louis Braille. »

  • copies des gabarits (annexes 1 à 4)
  • ciseaux
  • colle
  • sacs en papier
  • papier
  • crayons
  • blocs, Lego ou pâte à modeler (selon le matériel disponible)
  • tableau et craie ou papier grand format et marqueurs
  • bâtonnets de bois
  • autres matériaux pour créer les marionnettes (plumes, ouates, brillants, cartons, papier de soie, etc.)

LEÇON

Réflexion

Groupe-classe et petits groupes

Avant la lecture

  • Comparez des objets familiers dans la salle de classe (des blocs, des Lego, des jouets). Discutez avec le groupe : « Comment sont-ils pareils? Comment sont-ils différents? » Encouragez l’élève à utiliser des adjectifs et des expressions de comparaison et à employer les termes gros, petit, long, court, plein, vide, lourd ou léger pour partager ses observations.
  • Comparez les ressemblances et les différences de deux élèves dans la classe. Discutez avec le groupe : « Comment sont-ils pareils? Comment sont-ils différents? »
  • Au tableau ou sur du grand papier, faites un remue-méninge guidé avec le groupe à propos de « Comment sommes-nous différents? »
    Comment sommes-nous différents?
  • Montrez au groupe la couverture du livre. En regardant les images et le titre du livre, demandez à l’élève de faire des prédictions. Qui sont les personnages principaux? Où sont-ils? Que font-ils? Est-ce qu’ils sont heureux ou tristes? Qu’est-ce qui permet à l’élève de le savoir?

Action

Durant la lecture

Puisque l’histoire est assez longue pour ce niveau, la lecture est divisée en trois parties. Avant chacune des lectures, l’élève résume l’histoire lue en classe jusqu’à présent et fait des prédictions. Après chacune des lectures, l’élève fait les activités des différents centres d’apprentissage.

Première lecture – Jusqu’à la page 9, « Votre petite cane… »

Posez à l’élève la question : « Comment Meringuette est-elle différente des autres canetons? » Encouragez une discussion guidée. Meringuette a des difficultés de mobilité. Discutez des autres difficultés ou handicaps que les gens peuvent avoir. « Connais-tu quelqu’un qui a un handicap? »

Deuxième lecture – Jusqu’à la page 14, « Madame Larivière emmenait… »

Collez sur des bâtonnets de bois le dessin d’une bouche ou d’une oreille (voir l’annexe 1). Divisez les élèves en groupes de deux et remettez à chaque élève un bâtonnet avec la bouche ou avec l’oreille. Expliquez que l’élève qui tient l’oreille écoute et que l’élève qui tient la bouche parle. Posez les questions suivantes : « Comment Meringuette se sentait-elle quand les autres canards ne voulaient pas jouer avec elle? Est-ce que cela t’est déjà arrivé? Raconte à ta ou ton camarade comment tu te sentais à ce moment-là. »

Troisième lecture – Jusqu’à la fin de l’histoire.

Durant la lecture, encouragez l’élève à regarder les images et les visages des personnages pour découvrir leurs émotions. Posez les questions suivantes : « Comment Meringuette se sent-elle à la fin de l’histoire? Pourquoi? »

Après la lecture

L’élève se rend aux centres d’apprentissage. Dans les centres, l’élève a l’occasion d’explorer des idées et des concepts et de développer, individuellement ou en groupe, de nouvelles connaissances et habiletés.

Centre 1 – Centre de création artistique

L’élève crée une marionnette de canard en sac de papier (voir l’annexe 4). Discutez des formes qu’on voit sur le gabarit (triangles, cercles, rectangles, étoiles et cœurs). Variation : les cœurs (les ailes des canards) pourraient être remplacés par les mains tracées de l’élève. Mettez à la disposition des élèves du matériel varié pour qu’ils complètent leurs marionnettes selon leurs goûts afin que le résultat final démontre que ce sont toutes des canes mais qu’elles sont différentes.

Centre 2 – Centre de dramatisation

Pour cette tâche, l’élève utilise la marionnette créée au centre précédent. L’élève raconte l’histoire en imitant la voix d’un canard, tout en utilisant les marionnettes. Si les canards pouvaient parler, que diraient-ils? L’élève recrée la scène où les canards invitent Meringuette à jouer avec eux à la fin de l’histoire. Suggestions : Guidez les élèves à faire une mini présentation aux autres élèves de la classe « Voici ma cane. Elle est différente parce que… Elle est semblable aux autres parce que… ».

Centre 3 – Centre de construction

Proposez aux élèves qui choisissent ce centre de construire la ferme ou sont allés vivre les frères et sœurs de Maringuette la cane. L’élève construit des formes ou des structures avec des blocs, des Lego ou de la pâte à modeler (selon les matériaux disponibles et choisis par l’élève). L’élève planifie sa création, la réalise et fait, avec vous, une rétroaction sur son œuvre. Comment sa création est-elle différente de celles de ses amis? Comment est-elle semblable? Encouragez l’élève à utiliser des adjectifs et des expressions de comparaison et à employer les termes gros, petit, long, court, plein, vide, lourd ou léger pour partager ses observations.

Centre 4 – Centre d’écriture guidée

Chaque élève complète la phrase « Je suis différente (ou différent), parce que… ». Discutez des éléments suivants : « Comment es-tu différente (ou différent) et unique? ». (…parce que je parle italien, …parce que j’adore les cornichons, …parce que j’ai des lunettes). Écrivez la phrase pour l’élève, puis l’élève l’illustrera.

Suggestion d’adaptation : L’élève peut écrire son nom en haut de son dessin (ou, si c’est tôt dans l’année scolaire ou que l’élève a de la difficulté à écrire son nom, vous pouvez tracer les lettres de son nom en pointillés, et l’élève relie ensuite les points pour former les différentes lettres de son nom).

Les pages illustrées par chaque élève deviendront les pages d’un livre de classe : Nous sommes spéciaux parce que nous sommes tous différents! Le livre circulera tour à tour chez chaque élève afin que les enfants puissent partager leur travail avec leurs parents.

Centre 5 – Centre de lecture partagée

Au centre de lecture partagée, vous lisez Le livre noir des couleurs. Après la lecture, l’élève crée son nom en braille (voir les annexes 2 et 3).

Note à l’enseignant(e) – Vous pouvez joindre ces deux centres (le centre d’écriture guidée et le centre de lecture partagée).

Évaluation

Évaluation au service de l’apprentissage

Observation : Est-ce que l’élève connaît ce que veut dire différent? Ce que veut dire faire une prédiction?

Évaluation en tant qu’apprentissage

Observation : Est-ce que l’élève est engagé durant l’apprentissage? Est-ce que l’élève peut utiliser les adjectifs appropriés pour décrire les différences? Est-ce que l’élève est capable de faire des prédictions en regardant la page couverture, le titre et les images?

Objectivation

Est-ce que l’élève comprend l’importance d’inclure tout le monde? Est-ce que l’élève est capable d’exprimer oralement, ou grâce à ses activités aux différents centres d’apprentissage, pourquoi cela est important?

Est-ce que l’élève est capable de démontrer oralement, ou grâce à ses activités dans les différents centres d’apprentissage, comment elle ou il est différent ou unique?

Notes d’observations

Prendre des notes d’observations est une bonne façon de recueillir des données d’évaluation sur le travail ou l’interaction de l’élève en classe. Consultez l’exemple du ministère de l’Éducation ci-dessous :

Nom Marcus A.
Date Observations
4 octobre
  • Il s’est levé durant une activité de groupe, a parcouru la salle, a regardé sur les étagères et est revenu au groupe.
7 octobre
  • Durant la lecture, il a regardé ailleurs, puis il est redevenu attentif.
  • Il a attendu que ce soit son tour de parler durant une discussion de classe.

Source : Programme d’apprentissage à temps plein de la maternelle et du jardin d’enfants, 2010-2011, Version provisoire, p. 41.

Consolidation

En utilisant des questions d’approfondissement, essayez de faire ressortir les messages de sensibilisation à l’accessibilité définis pour cette unité.

Discutez avec les élèves des façons dont nous sommes tous différents, en consultant le remue-méninge préparé au début de la leçon. Ajouter d’autres idées présentées par la classe.

Lisez avec les élèves le livre de classe préparé au centre 5, Nous sommes spéciaux parce que nous sommes tous différents! Discutez de l’importance d’inclure tout le monde, peu importe leurs différences.

RÉFLEXION DE L’ENSEIGNANTE OU DE L’ENSEIGNANT

Est-ce que j’ai promu l’idée que c’est bien d’être différent ou unique?

Afin de rejoindre autant d’élèves que possible, est-ce que j’ai utilisé des stratégies pédagogiques qui sont adaptées aux élèves et qui incorporent, conformément à des pratiques exemplaires, du matériel et des méthodes accessibles?

Les ressources que j’ai choisies conviennent-elles au niveau de mes élèves et sont-elles diversifiées, de façon à répondre aux besoins de chacun d’eux?

Si les ressources que j’ai choisies ont présenté des aspects de certains handicaps, est-ce que la perspective adoptée était axée sur les points forts des personnes ayant ces handicaps?

Est-ce que j’ai eu recours à la différenciation pédagogique et à l’évaluation différenciée pour adapter mon enseignement aux divers styles d’apprentissage de mes élèves?

L’intérêt de tous mes élèves s’est-il maintenu à toutes les étapes de la leçon? Comment puis-je savoir que c’est bien le cas?

Mes processus d’évaluation ont-ils été justes et équitables? Est-ce que j’ai eu recours à des pratiques exemplaires et répondu aux besoins individuels de mes élèves? Est-ce que j’ai accordé des adaptations justes et équitables à mes élèves ayant des besoins d’apprentissage particuliers?

Comment est-ce que je m’assure que la notion d’accessibilité est non seulement discutée en classe, mais aussi intégrée à tous les sujets de conversation qui y sont abordés?

Comment pourrais-je améliorer cette leçon dans l’avenir?

Comment puis-je améliorer mes propres pratiques pédagogiques pour mieux tenir compte des questions concernant la sensibilisation à l’accessibilité?

Comment est-ce que j’aide à promouvoir la sensibilisation à l’accessibilité dans mon école et mon conseil scolaire, et que j’en partage les résultats avec les parents et mes collègues?

Annexes

Annexe 1

Ear and mouth

Annexe 2

Braille alphabet

Annexe 3

Braille grid

Annexe 4

shapes