Grade 9/10 ENG1D: Interview - The Honourable David C. Onley

Introduction

Lesson Summary

The Honourable David C. Onley, 28th Lieutenant Governor of Ontario, is interviewed by a student trustee about his careers choices, his experiences as a person with a disability and his strong commitment to accessibility in Ontario. His Honour emphasizes the importance of accessibility awareness for students. In this lesson, students examine issues of accessibility in general and in their own school.

At the discretion of the teacher, they will compare this video to another one from a popular television show that is housed on the Lieutenant Governor’s website.

Connections to Accessibility Awareness – The Big Ideas

The following accessibility messages are addressed in the video or the activities in this lesson:

  • A “barrier” is anything that prevents a person from fully participating in all aspects of society because of his or her disability.
  • Students can help to overcome barriers to learning in their classrooms.
  • Everybody learns differently and fair is not the same as equal.
  • The biggest barriers to accessibility are attitude and lack of awareness.
  • Students have an important role to play in advocacy for change.
  • The foundation of accessibility is the importance of human rights for all.

Considerations

Important Considerations for Program Planning

In keeping with the inclusive nature of accessibility and best teaching practices, lessons and instruction must provide a continuum of supports for all students, including those with accessibility considerations and/or special education needs. The front matter of all revised curriculum policy documents highlights elements to consider in planning classroom lessons and instruction, including Universal Design, differentiated instruction, equity and inclusive education, the perspective of First Nation, Métis and Inuit people, meeting the needs of English language learners and of students with special education needs. See the Accessibility+ hub for more information about these and related topics.

Community Connections

Connections with parents, members of the broader school community, agencies and institutions, social services, community organizations, corporations, and local businesses provide important opportunities for supporting accessibility awareness for students. Community partners can be an important resource in students’ learning as volunteers, mentors, guest speakers, participants in the school’s accessibility events or models of accessibility awareness in the life of the community. Modelling and mentoring can enrich not only the educational experience of students but also the life of the community. Schools should ensure that partnerships are nurtured within the context of strong educational objectives.

If the the topic of a lesson is a disability and a student in the classroom has that disability, it is important to discuss that lesson with the student, if appropriate, and his or her parents so that planning can be respectful and strengths-based in perspective.

Curriculum

Curriculum Document/Grade/Course Code

The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 & 10/English (2005) - Media Studies: ENG1D

Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

  1. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions and Techniques: identify some media forms and explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning

With minor adjustments, many other expectations of the secondary English, Social Studies or the Arts could be addressed by the content of this lesson.

Instruction & Context

Instructional Components and Content

Learning Goals

Students and the teacher will work together to create Learning Goals in student friendly language that are connected to the curriculum expectations. Co-created Learning Goals should be posted in the classroom for reference. Please see the Accessibility+ hub for more information.

Success Criteria

Success Criteria stating what the successful attainment of the Learning Goals would look like will developed by the teacher and the class based on the curriculum expectations, the students’ ability to demonstrate knowledge of content, to use critical thinking processes, to make connections and to draw on personal knowledge or experience according to the nature of the activity. Co-created Success Criteria should be posted in the classroom for reference.

Please see the Accessibility+ hub for more information.

Differentiated Instruction and Assessment

Please refer to Learning for All: A Guide to Effective Assessment and Instruction for All Students, Kindergarten to Grade 12 for more information about differentiated instruction and assessment practices.

Readiness

Readiness

To successfully complete these activities, students should have prior experience with:

Viewing a video

Co-creating Learning Goals and Success Criteria

Measuring with a measuring tape or ruler

Taking notes

Group work

Class discussion

Presenting information orally to the class

Terminology

Accessible, accessibility, advocacy, attitude, barrier, bias, human rights, inaccessible, mobility impairment, Lieutenant Governor, perspective, ramp, scooter, student trustee, wheelchair

Materials and Equipment

Video – An Interview with the Lieutenant Governor from the TeachAble website

Questions Handout (Appendix #1)

Video Viewing Guide (Appendix #2)

Materials for taking notes

Measuring tape or ruler

Is our school accessible? (Appendix #3)

Paper & pen/pencil

Art supplies

Video - Rick Mercer and The Honourable David C. Onley, 28th Lieutenant Governor of Ontario

Lesson

Activity #1 Learning about Accessibility from Viewing a Video

Pre-viewing Activities: Personal Writing/Discussion:

Ask students to work individually to answer the following questions by writing down a few points or ideas. Use the Video Viewing Guide if appropriate (Appendix 1). Students should be prepared to share their knowledge and ideas with the class.

  • Based on the title, what do you think this video will be about?
  • What do you know about the role of the Lieutenant Governor?
  • How is the Lieutenant Governor selected or appointed?
  • Where does the Lieutenant Governor work?
  • What do you know about The Honourable David C. Onley, who was appointed Ontario’s Lieutenant Governor in 2007?

Ask students to discuss their ideas in small groups or lead a whole-class discussion about the questions.

Viewing

Distribute Appendix #1or Appendix # (Teacher choice). Show the video and ask students to take notes while listening for the key points that The Honourable David C. Onley, 28th Lieutenant Governor of Ontario makes as he answers the Student Trustee’s questions. Use these questions to help students organize their notes.

  • What perspective or biases do you think these people might have?
    • Lieutenant Governor
    • Student Trustee
    • A student viewing the video
  • What are the main topics addressed in the interview?
  • How does the interviewer use questions to obtain specific information and to deepen her understanding?
  • What techniques does the Lieutenant Governor use to clarify his responses?
  • What are some of the examples from his own life that the Lieutenant Governor uses in his answers?
  • What does The Honourable David C. Onley, 28th Lieutenant Governor of Ontario say are the greatest barriers to accessibility?
  • What are some examples of attitudinal barriers that we see in our society and in our school?
  • How might attitudinal barriers affect the learning of students with disabilities?
  • How might attitudinal barriers affect the learning of students without disabilities?
  • How can teachers help to break down attitudinal barriers in their classrooms?
  • How can students help to break down attitudinal barriers in their classrooms?
  • What items are visible in the video that help explain the history and the role of the Lieutenant Governor?
  • What purpose does the scooter serve in the video?

After Viewing

  1. Following the video, ask students if the video was about what they predicted or if there were other topics covered. Students will likely bring up the topic of accessibility. Ask and discuss the following questions:

    • Who is the person being interviewed?
    • Who is doing the interviewing?
    • Where does the interview take place? What clues do you have?
    • How would you describe the tone of the video? Give some examples.
    • The Lieutenant Governor talks about “accessibility”. What does the word “accessibility” mean to you?
    • What do you know about visible and invisible disabilities?
    • What kinds of barriers might create difficulties for people with disabilities?
    • Do you think people with disabilities face barriers in our school?
    • Why is it important to ensure that people have equal access to places like schools?
  2. Divide the students into five groups, one for each statement from the list below. Give each group one of the following Accessibility Awareness statements.

The foundation of accessibility is the importance of human rights for all.

A “barrier” is anything that prevents a person from fully participating in all aspects of society because of his or her disability.

The biggest barriers to accessibility are attitude and lack of awareness.

Students need to help develop a school culture that fosters a sense of belonging for all students.

Students have an important role to play in advocacy for change.

Ask students to:

  • Discuss the meaning of the statement
  • Think of ways that the statement relates to their lives as students
  • Develop a creative way to communicate the idea to their classmates (rap, poem, commercial, skit, public service announcement, role plays, Q & A, poster). (Remind students to be respectful about the topic and to use appropriate language.)

Allow the students enough time to prepare a presentation and share it with the class.

After the presentations, facilitate a class discussion about the content and effectiveness of the messages in conveying the intent of each statement.

Activity #2 School Walk-About

Note: Parent or community volunteers may be helpful in facilitating this activity.

Select several parts of the school that can be explored by small groups of students to identify areas that might be inaccessible for people with mobility impairment. Each area explored should include a space that should ideally be accessible to all students, such as the front foyer, the office, the library, a washroom, the computer lab or the gymnasium. Ask students to form small groups or assign students to groups, give them an area of the school to explore, a copy of Appendix #3 and a tape measure or ruler.

  • Are there inaccessible entrances or spaces? What are they? What makes them inaccessible?
  • Is there an accessible elevator?
  • Is there a ramp into the school? The library? The gym? The office?
  • Are the doors wide enough for a wheelchair? (recommended width is 82 centimeters)
  • Where the doors are wide enough, could a person in a wheelchair open them while seated in his or her chair?
  • Where is the closest wheelchair-accessible washroom?
  • Are there other accessibility issues for a person with mobility impairment who uses a wheelchair or a scooter?

Back in the classroom, have groups compare their data. After having completed a tour, do they think the school is accessible? Are there some areas of the school that are not accessible? Were there any surprises? What needs to be done to improve accessibility in the school for people in wheelchairs? How can students be part of the change process to improve accessibility for people with mobility impairment?

Activity #3 Contrast and Compare Two Videos: Student Trustee and Rick Mercer and the Lieutenant Governor (optional)

Ask students if any of them are familiar with the Rick Mercer television show, The Mercer Report.

View the Rick Mercer video with The Honourable David C. Onley, 28th Lieutenant Governor of Ontario. This video is very different in tone from the video with the student trustee but it presents some of the same information and addresses some of the same issues.

In a class discussion, ask students to contrast and compare the two videos in terms of:

  • tone
  • setting
  • intended purpose(s)
  • content (Were the messages similar? What information was different?)
  • the way the Lieutenant Governor and Rick Mercer communicated with each other as compared to the way the Lieutenant Governor and Jenny Williams communicated with each other
  • In your opinion:
    • Which video was more effective in explaining issues of accessibility? Why?
    • Which video gave the viewer more information about the history and role of the Lieutenant Governor?
  • With reference to the Rick Mercer video, ask these questions:
  • What perspective or biases do you think these people might have?
    • Lieutenant Governor
    • Rick Mercer
    • A student viewing the video
  • What are the main topics addressed in the interview?
  • How does the interviewer use questions to obtain specific information and to deepen his understanding?
  • What techniques does the Lieutenant Governor use to clarify his responses?
  • What are some of the examples from his own life that the Lieutenant Governor uses in his answers?
  • What items are visible that help explain the history and the role of the Lieutenant Governor?
  • What other people are seen in the video? What is their role in helping the viewer understand the messages in the video?

What purpose does the scooter serve in the Rick Mercer video? Does the scooter affect the attitude of the viewer of the video? How?

Possible Extension Activities

Community Connections

Invite a guest speaker from the community or a community organization to speak to the class about accessibility issues.

Consolidation

Consolidation

Did students demonstrate an understanding of the Big Ideas of Accessibility Awareness?
Using probing questions try to elicit key ideas related to the Accessibility Awareness statements for this unit:

  • A “barrier” is anything that prevents a person from fully participating in all aspects of society because of his or her disability.
  • Students can help to overcome barriers to learning in their classrooms.
  • Everybody learns differently and fair is not the same as equal.
  • The biggest barriers to accessibility are attitude and lack of awareness.
  • Students have an important role to play in advocacy for change.
  • The foundation of accessibility is the importance of human rights for all.

Invite students to share their thoughts about the lessons in this unit though artistic means. Students could talk to a partner about what they learned, small groups could cooperatively list some of the words and ideas from the unit, then students could individually or collaboratively create a poster, mural, role play or poem about what an accessible school would be like.

Reflection

Teacher Reflection

  • Did the intended messages about accessibility and barriers come across in my lesson?
  • Did I incorporate student-friendly teaching strategies that support best practices that incorporate accessible methods and materials to reach as many students as possible?
  • Are the resources I selected appropriate for the grade level and varied to meet the needs of all my students? If the resources I selected presented aspects of accessibility awareness, was the perspective strength based?
  • Did I use differentiated instruction and assessment to meet the varying learning styles of my students? Was I able to meet and accommodate for all of my students’ learning needs?
  • Were all my students engaged at all steps of the lesson? How do I know?
  • Were my assessment procedures fair and equitable? Have I used research-based strategies to meet the individual needs of my students? Have I accommodated in fair and equitable ways for students with special learning needs to demonstrate their understanding? Did I provide opportunities for my students to reflect on their learning to improve their work? Were students successful? How do I know?
  • How do I ensure that the concept of accessibility is not only discussed but embedded in all conversation topics taught in the classroom?
  • How could this lesson be improved in the future?
  • How can I improve my own teaching practice to better address accessibility awareness issues?
  • Was I able to make connections or forge partnerships with parents or members of the community as part of this unit?
  • How do I help promote accessibility awareness across my school and school board and share the results with parents and colleagues?

Appendices

APPENDIX # 1

Taking Notes During the Viewing

What perspective or biases do you think these people might have?

  • Lieutenant Governor


  • Student Trustee


  • A student viewing the video


What are the main topics addressed in the interview?





How does the interviewer use questions to obtain specific information and to deepen her understanding?





What techniques does the Lieutenant Governor use to clarify his responses?





What are some of the examples from his own life that the Lieutenant Governor uses in his answers?





What does The Honourable David C. Onley, 28th Lieutenant Governor of Ontario say are the greatest barriers to accessibility?





What are some examples of attitudinal barriers that we see in our society and in our school?





How might attitudinal barriers affect the learning of students with disabilities?





How might attitudinal barriers affect the learning of students without disabilities?





How can teachers help to break down attitudinal barriers in their classrooms?





How can students help to break down attitudinal barriers in their classrooms?





What items are visible in the video that help explain the history and the role of the Lieutenant Governor?





What purpose (intended or not) does the scooter serve in the video?





APPENDIX # 2

Video Viewing Guide

BEFORE THE VIDEO
I. Look at the title of the video.

a. Can you guess what the topic of this video will be?


b. Write down three things that you already know about this video.




c. Write down three things that you would like to know about this video.




DURING THE VIDEO
As you watch the video, take notes on any important information. Remember to use symbols and abbreviations to help you.

















AFTER THE VIDEO
I. Now it is time for you to organize your notes. The video presented several main ideas. It also provided specific examples or details to support the main ideas.

Look back at your notes and try to find the main ideas and examples/details presented in the video. You can organize your information in the chart below.

Main Ideas Examples/details

II. Did you learn new words when watching the video? Look up their definitions in your dictionary and write them down in the chart below.

Words Definitions

III. Now look at the notes you took while viewing the video. What new ideas did you learn about this topic that you didn’t know before?





Using your notes and thoughts about the video, complete the following Video Viewing Guide.

Video Viewing Guide

Title:


  1. Who is highlighted in this video? Why?




  1. Who is asking the questions?




  1. Where does the interview take place? How do you know?




  1. What is the video about?




  1. What is the main purpose of the video?




  1. Is this an interesting interview? Why or why not?




APPENDIX # 3

Is our school accessible?

Are all entrances or spaces accessible? If some are not, what are they? What makes them inaccessible?





Is there an accessible elevator?





Is there a ramp into the school? The library? The gym? The office?





Are the doors wide enough for a wheelchair? (recommended width is 82 centimeters)





Where the doors are wide enough, could a person in a wheelchair open them while seated in his or her chair?





Where is the closest wheelchair-accessible washroom?





Are there other accessibility issues for a person with mobility impairment who uses a wheelchair or a scooter?